At Risk: Buildings by Frank Lloyd Wright, Marcel Breuer, Luigi Moretti

Demolition Threat: Lockridge Medical Clinic Building
by Frank Lloyd Wright, Whitefish, Montana, USA, 1958-1963
“Frank Lloyd Wright´s Lockridge Medical Clinic Building in Whitefish, Montana, is set to be demolished—unless a buyer comes forward with $1.7 million by January 11. And if no one fronts the money, this will be the architect´s first complete and intact building to be demolished in more than 40 years.

Lockridge Medical Clinic, completed shortly after Wright´s death in 1959, is one of only three remaining structures in Montana that he designed. It is an emblem of the architect´s Usonian vision, is listed on the the National Register of Historic Places, and has attracted visitors from around the globe, who come to marvel at one of the final works designed by the eminent architect. In 2016, multimillionaire developer and horse trainer Mick Ruis purchased the building with intent to demolish it as part of his plan to redevelop Whitefish´s growing community.”

More details: website

Under Threat: Parador Ariston
by Marcel Breuer, Mar Del Plata, Argentina, 1947

The Parador Ariston, on the Atlantic south coast, is the only work by Bauhaus master Marcel Breuer in Latin America. Created between 1946 and 1947 in collaboration with Carlos Coire and Eduardo Catalano, this beautiful structure was used as a restaurant and nightclub in its heyday. It is shaped like a four-leaved clover, with curved glazing that allows maximum sun penetration. The windows also allow a wide view of the dunes for which Mar Del Plata is famous. The building has an elevated floor, and was constructed within just 60 days using volcanic lava tiles, unusual in the region at the time. Unfortunately, the Parador Ariston has now reached an advanced state of disrepair, having been abandoned for at least 20 years and suffered the effects of sea air, weather and vandalism.

Docomomo International wishes to express its full support for all the efforts that may be carried out in order to respect the integrity of the original building, taking into consideration the history of the Parador Ariston and the will to maintain its authenticity for future generations.

PHOTO: Luis Ridao

Docomomo International Letter of Support: PDF below


Under Threat: Great Hall, Tour de la Bourse
by Luigi Moretti and Pier Luigi Nervi, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 1964

The Tour de la Bourse (Stock Exchange Tower) is a 48-story tower located at the intersection of Victoria Square and St. Jacques Street. Built in the International Style, it was the tallest building in Canada upon completion; today it is the third tallest in Montréal, and has a significant place in the history of architecture and of civil engineering. Pre-cast concrete columns at the building’s four corners frame aluminum curtain walls, which were renovated in 1995. The building is divided into three horizontally and features an impressive hall at ground level, with a downward winding staircase wrapped around a glass chandelier in the Modern style.

In the 1990s, plans were proposed to remove the staircase in the great hall, allowing a better line of sight to the commercial facilities at basement level. These were rejected after the intervention of Docomomo Quebec and other conservation organisations. However, the plans seem to have re-emerged and the hall is once again under threat. The staircase is an important and geometrically sophisticated architectural element of the Tour de la Bourse, with its detail repeated in the ceiling, and its removal would fundamentally alter the nature of the great hall.

The ground-breaking work of both architect Moretti and engineer Nervi has been recognized in recent exhibitions and publications, with retrospectives being held at MAXXI in Rome and the CIVA Foundation in Brussels respectively.

Docomomo International wishes to express its full support for all the efforts that may be carried out in order to respect the integrity of the original building, taking into consideration the history of the Tour de la Bourse and the will to maintain its authenticity for future generations.

error: Content is Protected