Exhibition | Modernism in Queensland

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Building modern Queensland 1945–75

9 July — 12 October

State Library of Queensland Cultural Precinct South Bank

Hot Modernism unearths the stories of Queensland’s mid-century architecture.

This moment in our history, inspired by a new way of thinking about sub-tropical living, brought a wave of fresh ideas, design and debate to the Queensland landscape. From the rolling expanse of the Riverside Expressway, to soaring concrete structures like the Torbreck apartment building, and houses explicitly tailored to our unique climate and lifestyle, this period of development paved the way for modern Queensland. See Queensland through new eyes in this immersive exhibition, featuring a full-scale re-creation of the 1957 Jacobi House, 3D models, and historical drawings. Then drop by the interactive Design our city space where you can build a Brisbane of the future.t in our history, inspired by a new way of thinking about sub-tropical living, brought a wave of fresh ideas, design andFrom the rolling expanse of the Riverside

Modernism in Queensland

1945–75 saw a dramatic transformation of the Queensland landscape.

Seeking a fresh start following the tragedy of World War Two, communities began to question tradition in search of modern and ‘better’ ways of living.

Inspired by global movements in modernist art and architecture, and mass production ideals, new architecture embraced simplified line, colour and style.

Eclectic nineteenth century neighbourhoods with their traditional timbered houses made way for mass produced cottages, high rise towers, multistorey car parks, community pools, expressways and shopping complexes.

Modified to meet the requirements of the state’s tropical and subtropical climates, the international flavour of modernism was tempered by a renewed interest in local practices and devices such as the verandah, the elevated house, and building with natural timbers.

As a result, a new approach to building and living — the ‘twentieth-century subtropical’ — quietly emerged in modern Queensland.

Expressway, to soaring concrete structures like the Torbreck apartment building, and houses explicitly tailored to our unique climate and lifestyle, this period of development paved the way for modern Queensland.

See Queensland through new eyes in this immersive exhibition, featuring a full-scale re-creation of the 1957 Jacobi House, 3D models, and historical drawings. Then drop by the interactive Design our city space where you can build a Brisbane of the future.

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