Architecture Museum: Chris A. Smith: Moving with the Times by Alison McDougall

Chris Smith cover

David O’Loughlin, Convenor: Art Deco and Modernism Society (SA Chapter), launched the Architecture Museum’s 9th publication in the Architecture Museum Monograph Series on Thursday 30th August, at the City of Holdfast Bay Council Chambers. Titled Chris A. Smith: Moving with the Times and written by Alison McDougall, the monograph was produced as a collaboration between the Architecture Museum and the ADMS. Marchelle Matthew from AAD’s Master of Communication Design program designed the monograph with design direction for the monograph series by Cara Briscoe, Danna Stoic and Lynda Kay.

Available for purchase for $20 plus postage by emailing architecturemuseum@unisa.edu.au 

 

OTHER PUBLICATIONS IN THE ARCHITECTURE MUSEUM MONOGRAPH SERIES

Russell S Ellis: Pioneer Modernist Architect | Louise Bird (2007)

As one of the pioneers of modernism in South Australia, Russell S Ellis (1912-1988) was an important figure in the state’s mid-twentieth century architectural history. Although Ellis’s repertoire was expansive,his ‘forte’ has been described as residential design. He was responsible for some of the best examples of Modern homes in South Australia as well as period or conventional designs; in them he achieved a balance between the requirements of his clients and his own ‘avant-garde’ designs and philosophies.
Out of Print.
A PDF copy of this Architecture Museum can be found on the Architecture Museum website

Brian Claridge: Architect of Light and Space | Adam Dutkiewicz (2008)

One of the generation of post-World War Two architects who had deep regard for the architect’s social and environmental responsibilities, Brian Claridge was an architect, writer, educator and public intellectual whose saw architecture as an artform and was an advocate of inventive, environmentally sensitive architecture between ca.1950-1970’. As a practitioner, author and architectural critic he contributed to public discussion and debate about modern architecture and design as well as creating buildings which expressed such beliefs.
Out of Print.
A PDF copy of this Architecture Museum monograph can be found on the Architecture Museum website

Moving to the Modern: Art Deco in South Australian Architecture | Carol Cosgrove (2009)

Art Deco celebrated the exciting and dramatic aspects of the machine age through the use of distinctive decorative elements. The Art Deco style appeared in a range of South Australian inter-war buildings, including those for commercial purposes such as banks, insurance offices, shops, showrooms, and hotels; local council chambers; factory administration buildings; cinemas and other public entertainment venues; town halls and private residences.
Out of Print.
A PDF of the Architecture Museum monograph can be found in the University of South Australia Library as an e-book

Harold T. Griggs: The People’s Architect | Melanie Cooper-Dobbin (2010)

Architect Harold Griggs was a key proponent of the small ‘ideal’ house in South Australia. His work provides a number of significant examples of how social, cultural, economic and political influences shaped the interwar and mid-century built environment. Given the enormous volume of Griggs’ architectural work, this monograph focuses on his designs for the small home. Such residences, designed by an architect who had chosen to specialise in domestic architecture, continue to survive as indicators and reminders of South Australia’s history and its place in a world standing on the brink of change.
Copies of the monograph are available for purchase from the Architecture Museum for $20.
Please email architecturemuseum@unisa.edu.au
A PDF of the Architecture Museum monograph can be found in the University of South Australia Library as an e-book

Designing for Communities: Russell & Yelland Architects | Alison McDougall (2011)

Russell & YellandArchitects is a South Australian firm established in 1939 by Charles Alexander (Alec) Russell and Keith Mills Yelland. It has a long history of working in metropolitan and country South Australia as well as in parts of regional New South Wales and Victoria, and on projects across a variety of sectors. The exhibition focused on the practice’s civic architecture and on the ways in which it worked closely with local people to design facilities that met their needs and budgets.Copies of the monograph are available for purchase from the Architecture Museumfor $20. Please email architecturemuseum@unisa.edu.au
A PDF of the Architecture Museum monograph can be found in the University of South Australia Library as an e-book

Unley Park: An Architectural Portrait | Bridget Jolly (2012)

Once described as a ‘rus-in-urbe’ on the Adelaide fringe, the suburb of Unley Park, settled in the 1850s, has been the site for numerous architect-designed dwellings and associated commissions. Unley Park: An Architectural Portrait introduces a selection of the architects and their clients and projects and reveals the influence of their designs on the suburb’s distinctive landscape, particularly through the twentieth century.
Copies of the monograph are available for purchase from the Architecture Museum for $20.
Please email architecturemuseum@unisa.edu.au
A PDF of the Architecture Museum monograph can be found in the University of South Australia Library as an e-book

 

Concrete Expressions: Brutalism and the Government Buildings Precinct, Adelaide | Kevin O’Sullivan (2013)

https://www.oapen.org/cover/2/5/2/643252/643252_cover.jpgKevin O’Sullivan tells of the history and cultural significance of four purpose-built, government buildings in the Adelaide CBD: Wakefield House, the former Motor Registration Centre, the Education Department Building and the Forensic Sciences Centre. Collectively they represent the progressive governmental, social and architectural confidence of their time. Out of Print.
Link to Concrete Expressions e-book through the OPEN Library

‘Not for ourselves alone’: The South Australian Home Builders’ Club 1945-1965 | Julie Collins and Christine Garnaut (2013)

The South Australian Home Builders Club Incorporated (SAHBC) operated between 1945 and 1965 and built about 400 housesin metropolitan Adelaide, thus making a critical contribution to the state’s post warhousing shortage. Organised as a cooperative and run on collaborative lines, the SAHBC offered a unique means of obtaining a house in the face of building restrictions and constraints. Club members were not skilled in design and building but learnt on the job and taught each other. The monograph utilised oral histories of club members to build a picture of post war Adelaide and the community collaboration that delivered homes to hundreds of young families.
Copies of the monograph are available for purchase from the Architecture Museumfor $20.
Please email architecturemuseum@unisa.edu.au

Neighbourhood Shops: Park and shop centres in metropolitan Adelaide, 1955-1985 | Louise Bird (2018)

The neighbourhood shopping centre was a vital part of Adelaide’s planned residential communities. Such centres were envisaged and built as a hub of community activity and offered residents a new way to shop in a safe pedestrian environment that also accommodated the growing use of cars. Neighbourhood Shopsconsiders selected key international developments in shop types in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, as well as the role of shops in planned residential developments, and examines the design features of the park and shop shopping centres built in metropolitan Adelaide between 1955 and 1985.
Copies of the monograph are available for purchase from the Architecture Museumfor $20.
Please email architecturemuseum@unisa.edu.au